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Fortune: Andy Grove on battery powerupdated: Fri Apr 17 2009 09:31:00

When gas was topping $4 a gallon last summer, the urgency to find alternative sources of energy to power cars and trucks became clear to most Americans. But with oil prices toppling since, the push for new energy technologies is being shoved aside by the nation's other economic woes. That is a mistake that could cost the United States everything - especially if this recession is followed by a period of fast growth.

The day in numbers: 50updated: Thu Oct 26 2006 05:31:00

50 years: A conference in Stockholm today celebrates the 50th anniversary of the world's first mobile telephone system. In 1956 the telecommunications company Ericsson created the pioneering mobile network called "Mobile Telephony A " (MTA) in the Swedish capital.

Business 2.0: AT&T hears the call of softwareupdated: Thu Sep 21 2006 11:31:00

In telecom, nobody wants to be just a dumb pipe.

Business 2.0: Gear we can't live withoutupdated: Thu May 18 2006 09:54:00

SAN FRANCISCO (Business 2.0 Magazine) - Sometimes the most useful gear isn't the newest.

Business 2.0: Favoritesupdated: Mon May 01 2006 00:01:00

Flyby Math

CNNMoney: The 70 percent solutionupdated: Mon Nov 28 2005 10:46:00

Before he arrived at Google in 2001 to serve as adult supervision for Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Eric Schmidt was little known outside SiliconValley.

Phones will soon be able to smellupdated: Tue Sep 20 2005 07:21:00

An "electric nose" that can distinguish the personal scent of an individual may begin to replace four-digit pin numbers and secret passwords within the next decade.

Fortune: Out on the Cutting Edge updated: Mon Sep 19 2005 00:01:00

Artist Max Gschwind illustrates NASA's moon-shot calculations, from "A Problem in Celestial Gunnery," June 1962.

Fortune: AT&T'S GOLDEN BOY LOOKS BACKupdated: Mon Jul 25 2005 00:01:00

At AT&T's very last annual meeting, on June 30, shareholders voted to accept a takeover bid from SBC, one of its former corporate children. It spelled the end for Ma Bell, the 120-year-old behemoth...

Business 2.0: A Very Modest Proposalupdated: Fri Oct 01 2004 00:01:00

Countries are a lot like companies. For both of them, it's a lot easier to maintain a position of competitive advantage than to regain leadership once it's lost. Skeptics say no president can do mu...

Fortune: Scientific Americans A photographic look at one of the crown jewels of the U.S. economy and the FORTUNE 500: the R&D lab.updated: Mon Sep 20 2004 00:01:00

What killed the cat makes us rich. To be more specific: If it weren't for the intellectual curiosity of engineers and scientists thinking things through, trying out ideas, and taking wild guesses i...

Fortune: Cellular Evolution It took decades for an old technology called mobile telephony to take off. But it did take off--and changed tupdated: Mon Aug 23 2004 00:01:00

On Oct. 13, 1983, Bob Barnett, an executive at Ameritech, the erstwhile Baby Bell, sat in a car parked outside Soldier Field in Chicago and made the country's first commercial cellular phone call. ...

Business 2.0: The Best New Technologies of 2003 Forget all the futuristic hype. These innovations are here now, we know they work, and they'reupdated: Sat Nov 01 2003 00:01:00

New technologies rarely change the world overnight. The tipping point is hard to predict. That's why investing in tech startups is such a high-risk gamble. When does a technology become "real"? Whe...

Business 2.0: A New Dimension In Storageupdated: Sat Nov 01 2003 00:01:00

Science-fiction fans may feel they already know about "holographic storage," having witnessed Princess Leia's desperate, recorded plea to Obi-Wan Kenobi in Star Wars. Alas, that's not quite the use...

Fortune: Feed Your Head This spring's best business books grapple with gurus, medicine, and biotech's effect on management.updated: Mon May 12 2003 00:01:00

Beyond gurus

Money Magazine: The Lost World WHAT DID WE GAIN--AND WHAT DID WE REALLY LOSE--FROM THE TELECOM REVOLUTION? SEARCHING FOR ANSWERS IN THE FATE OF updated: Sat Mar 01 2003 00:01:00

I grew up in a house just a few hundred yards from Bell Laboratories, back when it was the research-and-development arm of AT&T. I knew every ball field on the campus, every building, every post wh...

Money Magazine: Start Your Engines What drives the markets, the business world--and the automakersupdated: Sat Mar 01 2003 00:01:00

Call me a geek, but I've never been much of a car guy. The stock market? I love it. Mutual funds? I'm fascinated. But for some reason cars never really made my blood churn. Until I met Lawrence Ulr...

Fortune: Meet the New Cable Guyupdated: Mon Jul 23 2001 00:01:00

When it comes to Narad Networks, neither of its co-founders, Dev Gupta and Andy Chapman, is prone to understatement. "This is the next-generation Internet," says CEO Gupta. Adds Chapman, who heads ...

Fortune: Confessions Of A Transistor Hogupdated: Mon Jun 25 2001 00:01:00

Think you've got a pretty strong grip on the progress of the Info Age? Okay, answer this: How many transistors do you own?

Fortune: Look Who's Doing R&D Big corporate labs are cutting back on research when they don't see a quick payoff. But plenty of smallupdated: Mon Nov 27 2000 00:01:00

Bell Labs gave birth to the transistor. And the laser. And motion pictures. And long-range TV broadcasts. And real-time language translation. And on and on, so that over time this venerable institu...

Fortune: Arno Penzias "Bandwidth is like money and sex--only too much seems to be enough."updated: Mon Oct 09 2000 00:01:00

Arno Penzias, former chief scientist of Bell Labs, is now a venture capitalist at New Enterprise Associates. He won the 1978 Nobel Prize in physics for his contribution to the big bang theory. He w...

Fortune: Mind The Gapupdated: Mon Oct 09 2000 00:01:00

Barely one in 5,000 Africans has access to the Internet, often through services such as the one advertised at left, in Kampala, Uganda. But a project is under way to encircle the continent with 32,...

Fortune: Nanotechupdated: Mon Oct 09 2000 00:01:00

When it comes to the mirrors in optical switches, small is all. That's because the smaller the mirrors, the more of them you can cram into a single switch, making it possible to route ever more opt...

Fortune: What Minority Employees Really Want IT'S SIMPLE: INCLUSION, ENCOURAGEMENT, AND OPPORTUNITY. BUT HOW DO YOU KNOW YOU'RE REALLY PRupdated: Mon Jul 10 2000 00:01:00

A group of scientists from Lucent Technologies' vaunted Bell Labs are eating lunch and talking about the most delicate subject in corporate America, or anywhere else in America: race. Over sandwich...

Fortune: What's a New Economy Without Research? Paul Allen just shut down his fancy R&D facility. So who's going to updated: Mon May 15 2000 00:01:00

I was really sorry to see that Paul Allen closed his Interval Research lab in Palo Alto. Paul is a nice guy who continues to do interesting things--it is amazing what you can do when you have $20 b...

Money Magazine: Optic Uptick Nortel is up more than 300%, but how can it maintain such lofty heights?updated: Sat Apr 01 2000 00:01:00

Northern Telecom used to be a sleepy Canadian maker of (yawn) telephone-switching equipment. Then came John Roth. As head of North American operations, and CEO since 1997, he dismantled Northern Te...

FSB: Wired Wirelessupdated: Wed Dec 01 1999 00:01:00

As the hottest sector of telecommunications gets hotter, new wireless telephones, pagers, and related gadgets are surging into the market from such makers as Ericsson, Motorola, Nokia, Samsung, and...

Fortune: Go West! Lucent, the $38-billion-a-year telecom equipment behemoth, is heading to Silicon Valley--to reiupdated: Mon Nov 22 1999 00:01:00

Driving into the old Ascend headquarters in Alameda, Calif., you first notice the flags flying in front of the building: One sports Lucent Technologies' stylish, lipstick-red logo; the other, the C...

Fortune: A Century of Businessupdated: Mon Apr 26 1999 00:01:00

Who changed your life the most? Throughout human existence, life has typically varied little in 100 years; yet no one at the 20th century's dawn could have imagined the reality of life at its end. ...

Fortune: The Dawn of E-Serviceupdated: Mon Nov 09 1998 00:01:00

When you make an airline reservation, why can't the computer take care of setting up the whole trip? The computer knows you need transportation to and from your home airport, and a hotel room and r...

Fortune: Talking Networks, Disease, and Yes, Dry-Cleaning With Arno Penzias, Nobel Laureateupdated: Mon Jun 08 1998 00:01:00

On May 1, Nobel laureate and Bell Labs chief scientist Arno Penzias retired after 37 years with AT&T and Lucent. The day before he signed off, he joined a group of FORTUNE editors for lunch and gav...

Fortune: Lucent Has A Brand-New Battle Lucent is headed for vicious competition with datacom power Cisco Systems. The AT&T spinoff haupdated: Mon May 25 1998 00:01:00

As his whirlybird settles on the landing pad beside Lucent's Darth Vader-esque New Jersey headquarters on a golden, still April afternoon, CEO Richard McGinn, 51, is surely the master of his domain...

Fortune: IS LUCENT REALLY AS GOOD AS IT SEEMS? LIFE HAS BEEN ALL SWEETNESS AND LIGHT FOR LUCENT SINCE ITS LIBERATION FROM AT&T. A BRIupdated: Mon May 26 1997 00:01:00

If Lucent Technologies President Richard McGinn ever forgets how different the future will be for his company, he's apt to get a reminder at home. "My daughter wants to increase her access to the I...

Fortune: WORKING AT HOME--THE RIGHT WAY TO BE A STAR IN YOUR BUNNY SLIPPERS NEARLY NINE MILLION U.S. WORKERS HAVE BECOME TELECOMMUTERS, Aupdated: Mon Mar 03 1997 00:01:00

Sure, working at home can be good for your health. No horn-honking commute to add stress, no germ-laden recirculated air to keep that flu virus incubating, and no harsh fluorescent lighting to wear...

Money Magazine: AT&T'S BIG BANG: DON'T RUSH TO BUY THE PIECESupdated: Wed Jan 01 1997 00:01:00

THIS MONTH:

Fortune: PUTTING THE IDIOT IN IDIOT SAVANTupdated: Mon Jan 15 1996 00:01:00

To what stupidities are the smart especially prone? FORTUNE asked Dr. Arno Penzias--astrophysicist, research scientist, Nobel Prize-winner, and really, really smart guy--who, as Bell Labs' chief sc...

Fortune: HOW TO MAKE THE CEO BUY YOUR IDEA COMPANIES PAY LIP SERVICE TO THE GOAL OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP, BUT RARELY FOLLOW THROUGH. HERE'S Tupdated: Mon Dec 11 1995 00:01:00

Monsanto CEO Bob Shapiro leans across his black marble desk in Creve Coeur, Missouri, and extols that ultimate hierarchy buster, E-mail. "I love it," he says. "I'm directly connected with 25,000 of...

Fortune: NEW PATHS TO SUCCESS WORKING YOUR WAY UP THROUGH AN ELEPHANTINE BUREAUCRACY NO LONGER MAKES SENSE, ARGUES NOBEL updated: Mon Jun 12 1995 00:01:00

From early childhood on, our children are taught to equate progress with promotions. Playtime, nursery, prekindergarten, and kindergarten--a series of grades recognize the child's growth and prepar...

Fortune: HOW TO NURTURE CREATIVE SPARKS Workers burning with great ideas are your hottest competitive resource. Handle them right, and youpdated: Mon Jan 10 1994 00:01:00

NO SET OF WORKERS is at once so valuable and yet, typically, so poorly managed as creative people. Incomprehension and at times outright distaste on the part of many managers feed this neglect: Acc...

Fortune: BELL LABS: PRODUCTS BEFORE PRIZES updated: Mon May 17 1993 00:01:00

If Arno Penzias had arrived at AT&T Bell Laboratories in 1991 instead of 1961, he would never have won a Nobel Prize in physics. Today Penzias, 60, is a top manager at Bell Labs, with a substantial...

Fortune: FIXING THE ECONOMY WHAT THE U.S. CAN DO ABOUT R&D Research and development, critical to future competitiveness, is already oupdated: Mon Oct 19 1992 00:01:00

IS AMERICA investing enough in research and development, a cornerstone of future economic success? Total U.S. outlays for government and civilian R&D peaked at $157 billion in 1989 and have since s...

Fortune: PROGRESS IN PHONES MEANS PRIVACY PROBLEMS updated: Mon Aug 24 1992 00:01:00

You are lolling by the azure waters of a tropical atoll, 10,000 miles from workaday cares, suspended in the blissful limbo of a brochure-perfect honeymoon. At last you have a soul mate who apprecia...

Fortune: GETTING YOUR CALLS TO FOLLOW YOU RIGHT NOW updated: Mon Aug 24 1992 00:01:00

If you can't wait for the wireless revolution, a new service from AT&T will get you partway there: You can now drop in on friends and turn their phone into your own personal extension. Unlike call ...

Fortune: COLD FUSION HEATS UP AGAINupdated: Mon Jul 01 1991 00:01:00

Remember B. Stanley Pons, a former professor at the University of Utah, and his British collaborator, Martin Fleischmann? In 1989 they claimed to have produced cold fusion in a jar, potentially ope...

Fortune: DARPA: A BIG POT OF UNRESTRICTED MONEYupdated: Mon Jun 10 1991 00:01:00

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency -- Darpa, for short -- may have & done more for U.S. competitiveness than any other organization. The Pentagon agency started or funded some of the mos...

Fortune: A $9 MILLION COMPETITIVE EDGEupdated: Mon May 20 1991 00:01:00

The Commerce Department has begun a new effort to help fund research that is supposed to give U.S. companies -- and the U.S. itself -- a competitive boost. The 11 beneficiaries of this year's $9 mi...

Fortune: AMERICA'S HOT YOUNG SCIENTISTSupdated: Mon Oct 08 1990 00:01:00

SOMETIMES THE U.S. underestimates its own strength. In this age of increasing global competition, American science still sets the pace. According to the National Science Foundation, Americans inves...

Fortune: TURNING R&D INTO REAL PRODUCTS That has been America's weakness. But Hewlett-Packard, Allied-Signal, Du Pont, and other innoupdated: Mon Jul 02 1990 00:01:00

LAST MONTH a delegation of high-ranking executives from AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, made a quiet pilgrimage to the sunlit Palo Alto, California, headquarters of Hewlett-Packa...

Fortune: MAKING BIG GAINS FROM SMALL STEPS Constantly improving existing products, says IBM's former top scientist, is as critical as devupdated: Mon Apr 23 1990 00:01:00

REMEMBER Woody Hayes? The late, great Ohio State football coach had a passion for winning the old-fashioned way. His teams moved downfield not with razzle- dazzle passes but by grinding out 3 1/2 y...

Fortune: PRODUCTS TO WATCHupdated: Mon Jan 15 1990 00:01:00

ELDER CARE COUNSELING Halfway across the country your widowed mother is recovering from a recent stroke. The worst is over, and the hospital is letting her go home. But she needs special therapy an...

Fortune: MANAGING YOUR INTELLECTUALS They deal mainly with ideas rather than things, and most are on somebody's payroll. Getting them to updated: Mon Oct 23 1989 00:01:00

More and more people in business are genuine intellectuals, and managing these brainy, often quirky individualists can be quite a challenge. Few executives had more experience -- or were better at ...

Fortune: A QUANTUM LEAP IN ELECTRONICS A famous and paradoxical theory of modern physics may set off a transformation as profound as the updated: Mon Jan 30 1989 00:01:00

WHAT you're seeing in the photograph at right is a practical embodiment of one of man's most brilliant intellectual achievements. The tiny semiconductor laser in the palm of the scientist's hand is...

Fortune: WAS BREAKING UP AT&T A GOOD IDEA? The answer, on balance, is yes. Five years after divestiture, many customers enjoy lower cupdated: Mon Jan 02 1989 00:01:00

CRITICS WERE nearly apoplectic when the Justice Department, citing antitrust laws, moved to break up the phone company. The laments echoed across America: Why mess with a telecommunications system ...

Fortune: TECHNOLOGY IN THE YEAR 2000 Only a dozen years ago there were no PCs, no CDs, no VCRs, no genetically engineered vaccines. The nupdated: Mon Jul 18 1988 00:01:00

ALL IS VANITY, said the Preacher, and there is nothing new under the sun. Well, maybe there wasn't in the time of King Solomon, and anyway the author of Ecclesiastes was pondering the human conditi...

Fortune: THE NEW LOOK AT AMERICA'S TOP LAB How has Bell Labs weathered the breakup of AT&T? Surprisingly well. Basic research still tupdated: Mon Feb 01 1988 00:01:00

WHEN AT&T was broken up on January 1, 1984, admirers of Ma Bell's deep commitment to research wondered about the fate of AT&T Bell Laboratories -- the great American invention factory. Bell Labs ha...

Fortune: FORTUNE magazine contents page FEBRUARY 1, 1988 VOL. 117, NO. 3 updated: Mon Feb 01 1988 00:01:00

MONEY & MARKETS/Cover Story

Fortune: IBM, GE, AND DU PONT: THREE OTHER HOT LABSupdated: Mon Feb 01 1988 00:01:00

No other corporate R&D operation matches Bell Labs in size and scope, but some do as impressive a job in a number of areas. IBM's research division -- often % referred to by connoisseurs as ''the o...

Fortune: SUPERCONDUCTORS GET INTO BUSINESS Now that electricity can be transmitted with superefficiency, companies are exploring uses thaupdated: Mon Jun 22 1987 00:01:00

AFTER MONTHS of rising excitement, the big breakthrough came in May at IBM's sleekly sinuous Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York. Scientists had been making astoundingly ...

Fortune: AT&T'S EPIC PUSH IN COMPUTERS After a false start that cost billions, the telephone titan still wants a big win in data procupdated: Mon May 25 1987 00:01:00

VITTORIO CASSONI sometimes lies awake at night worrying that orders for AT&T's computers aren't piling up fast enough. Small wonder. When the fashionably tailored native of Parma, Italy, arrives at...

Fortune: BOOKS BOSSES READ Chiefs' choices reveal strong passions and surprising eccentricities. Favorites range from Taoism to the Bibleupdated: Mon Apr 27 1987 00:01:00

AFTER A CHIEF EXECUTIVE finishes the giant helping of reading he is required to consume, it seems remarkable that he would have any appetite left. But as FORTUNE found in an informal survey, many C...

Fortune: WHERE THE U.S. STANDS COMPUTERS, CHIPS, AND FACTORY AUTOMATIONupdated: Mon Oct 13 1986 00:01:00

IN THE HEADLONG RUSH of high technology, the driving force has been the computer and everything connected with it -- semiconductor chips, robots, telecommunications. By the year 2000 the electronic...

Fortune: WHAT TOMORROW HOLDSupdated: Mon Oct 13 1986 00:01:00

WHERE ARE SCIENCE and technology heading between now and the dawn of the 21st century? All indications are that the biggest advances over the next 15 years or so will come in two fields -- physics ...

Fortune: THE EDITOR'S DESK updated: Mon Oct 13 1986 00:01:00

THE MYSTERIOUS gleaming object in the gloved hand on our cover is not an exotic fragment from a distant galaxy but just one of the everyday wonders of the technological revolution: a silicon wafer ...

Fortune: UNDER THE SPELL OF THE QUALITY GURUS These consultants get up to $10,000 a day to help companies improve their products. If onlyupdated: Mon Aug 18 1986 00:01:00

THE PROBLEM, all too common among U.S. corporations: Too many of the company's formerly vaunted, fully automated whiz-bangs are banging when they should whiz. Customers are threatening to take up w...

Fortune: A GROWING GAP IN SOFTWARE Computers are getting more and more powerful, but the programs that run them cannot keep up. Business updated: Mon Apr 28 1986 00:01:00

THE COMPUTER REVOLUTION is at a turning point. Breakthrough after breakthrough in physics, semiconductor materials, and electrical engineering has created computers that process information at ever...

Fortune: PUTTING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ON A CHIP Bell Labs' new chips combine databases, rules of thumb, and ''fuzzy logic'' to controlupdated: Mon Feb 03 1986 00:01:00

A COMPUTER CHIP that combines the knowledge of experts and the imprecision of amateurs could bring artificial intelligence down to earth. Developed at AT&T Bell Laboratories, the experimental chip ...

Fortune: DIGITAL DIAGNOSES An innovation called PACS could aid patients' treatment and save hospitals money.updated: Mon Jul 22 1985 00:01:00

TECHNOLOGY, often cited as a cause of runaway health costs, may yet help slow the rate at which hospital bills are rising. An innovation called PACS, for picture archival communications system, pro...

Fortune: WHAT BELL LABORATORIES IS LEARNING FROM SLUGS The slow-moving creatures are being studied by AT&T scientists to find out howupdated: Mon Apr 01 1985 00:01:00

AT AT&T's famed Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, garden-variety slugs are nudging forward the frontier of computer science. Inspired by the discoveries of physicist John Hopfield, a team of Bell La...

Fortune: WHAT 25-YEAR-OLDS WANT Here come the baby-busters, and they are nothing at all like the workaholic yuppies who preceded them. Thupdated: Thu Jan 01 1970 00:00:00

ANGELA AZZARETTI, 25, the daughter of Italian immigrants, was graduated from the University of Illinois and took a job at Caterpillar's headquarters in Peoria during the summer of 1987. Angela's wa...

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