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Elementary and High School Education

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Giving a childhood to young cancer patientsupdated: Thu Feb 16 2012 17:00:00

Traveling down New York's Fifth Avenue, 4-year-old Joseph Mezzapesa sees his favorite store, Build-A-Bear Workshop, from the back seat of the family's SUV.

Fortune: School superintendent: A tough job to fillupdated: Tue Nov 01 2011 07:09:00

The job typically pays about $250,000 a year. That doesn't include the pension and fabulous benefits. You usually get a long-term contract. There's no competition. Customers can't leave. So why do so few talented people want such a great gig?

Judge rules Memphis city schools to merge with countyupdated: Mon Aug 08 2011 17:49:00

Public schools in Memphis, Tennessee, will be consolidated with those of the surrounding county beginning in 2013-14, a federal judge ruled Monday. The decision ends for now a yearslong fight over funding that spilled into questions of race and politics.

Michelle Obama set to inspire new generation of women leadersupdated: Tue Jun 21 2011 07:59:00

When Zimbabwean-born Brendah Nyakudya started raising funds to open nursery schools in South Africa's impoverished communities six years ago, she didn't expect that one day the project would secure her a spot at the most sought-after gathering of women on the continent.

First Lady meets African womenupdated: Tue Jun 21 2011 07:59:00

An African woman gets news that she is one of 75 chosen to meet with First Lady Michelle Obama. Nkepile Mabuse reports.

Extreme Parenting: toddler fitnessupdated: Sat Jan 22 2011 22:30:00

CNN's Christine Romans reports on an organization that gives structured fitness training to toddlers.

Going to extreme measures for child athletesupdated: Sat Jan 22 2011 22:30:00

Like many other American teens, 14-year-old Nick Heras wants to be a professional quarterback someday.

Atlanta public high schools placed on probationupdated: Wed Jan 19 2011 13:40:00

Atlanta's public school system was told Tuesday it has until September 30 to make progress on a series of recommendations or risk its high schools' losing their accreditation, a fate that would affect the college hopes of many of the system's graduates.

Fortune: Alabama schools turn to bank loans to operateupdated: Tue Aug 31 2010 10:10:00

Alabama schools have been having a rough time of it, and it only looks like it's going to get rougher. The Cotton State recently came in last place in the federal Department of Education's Race to the Top grant competition. And a steadfast global recession combined with the Gulf Coast oil spill this summer have put a severe strain on the state's tax receipts, the primary source of revenue for Alabama's education system, forcing several school systems to take out private loans just to make it through the year.

CNNMoney: What's missing for back-to-school? 135,000 teachersupdated: Fri Aug 20 2010 15:21:00

More children are crowding into classrooms in Modesto, Calif. Parents are paying extra to send their kids to full-day kindergarten in Queen Creek, Ariz. And the school buses stopped rolling in one St. Louis area school district.

Montana city's sex ed plans draw fireupdated: Fri Jul 16 2010 03:36:00

A proposed health curriculum in Helena, Montana, public schools has riled up some parents who say it starts teaching students about sex far too early.

Sex education for kids in kindergarten?updated: Fri Jul 16 2010 03:36:00

A school district in Montana is considering a curriculum that would teach sex education to kids as young as 5 years old.

Study: 1 in 10 Latino high school dropouts earn GEDupdated: Fri May 14 2010 15:55:00

Just one in 10 Latino high school dropouts earns a high school equivalency degree, compared with two in 10 African-American dropouts and three in 10 white dropouts, the Pew Hispanic Center said Thursday.

Meat cleaver attack leaves nine deadupdated: Thu May 13 2010 01:27:00

A murder-suicide in China leaves seven kindergarten students and two adults dead. CNN's John Vause reports.

Man with knife attacks kindergarten in Chinaupdated: Thu Apr 29 2010 12:17:00

At least 28 children were injured when a man with a knife attacked a kindergarten in east China on Thursday morning, state media said.

SI.com: Andy Staples: How one Ohio district's cancellation of sports has threatened the communityupdated: Thu Sep 17 2009 16:09:00

That first Friday at Grove City High was so quiet. Any other school year, the school's nationally acclaimed band would have ended the day by marching through the halls blasting the fight song. Any other school year, more than 11,000 would have gathered later that evening at the stadium behind the school to watch the Greyhounds -- better known as the Dawgs -- open their season. Any other school year, Friday would have meant something.

People.com: Jaycee Dugard's Abduction Haunted Her Young Classmatesupdated: Sun Sep 06 2009 22:26:00

"Everybody was scared," a former student recalls, "and the parents were even more scared than the kids"

People.com: Gosselin Kids Go Back to Schoolupdated: Thu Aug 27 2009 17:27:00

The twins start third grade and the sextuplets head to junior kindergarten

YouTube student rap stars take on poetryupdated: Wed Jul 22 2009 16:48:00

Seventh graders at Ron Clark Academy became an overnight sensation during the presidential election when their YouTube performance of "You Can Vote However You Like" catapulted them to online stardom.

YouTube student stars still rapping to learnupdated: Tue Jul 21 2009 16:40:00

Seventh graders at Ron Clark Academy became an overnight sensation during the presidential election when their YouTube performance of "You Can Vote However You Like" catapulted them to online stardom.

India's nursery school bluesupdated: Tue May 12 2009 00:14:00

CNN's Sara Sidner visits one of New Delhi's top ten nursery schools to find out why competition is so fierce.

Nursery school competition heats up in Indiaupdated: Tue May 12 2009 00:14:00

There was stone cold silence in the car, as the Kumars drove home.

Teens stay clean at special HSupdated: Thu Apr 16 2009 13:16:00

Recovering teens can go to special high schools to help them stay clean. Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports.

Data: U.S. teachers contracted to work longer than G-8 counterpartsupdated: Wed Mar 25 2009 19:40:00

Teachers in the United States are contracted to work more hours than their counterparts in other Group of Eight countries, according to a report released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Education.

I spy ... future gamblers in your kindergarten class?updated: Wed Mar 04 2009 17:56:00

Is your kindergartner easily distracted? Maybe a little hyper? This might seem like typical child behavior but a new study published in the March 2009 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine suggests it could be a red flag for a potential gambling addiction as he or she ages.

Is your child a gambler?updated: Wed Mar 04 2009 17:56:00

It may be possible to tell if a kindergartner will become an adult gambler. CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports.

Fortune: Bill and Melinda Gates go back to schoolupdated: Wed Nov 26 2008 05:59:00

When Bill Gates gets worked up about something, his body language changes. He suspends his habit of rocking forward and back in his chair and sits a little straighter. His voice rises in pitch. Today the subject is America's schools.

High school pregnancy pactupdated: Sun Jun 22 2008 21:52:00

CNN's Randi Kaye reports on an increase in pregnancies at one high school that appears to have beeen deliberate.

Time.com: China Police Face Off With Protestsupdated: Thu Jun 12 2008 10:00:00

Chinese police cordoned off quake-hit schools and towns Thursday in an apparent attempt to quell protests by parents angry over shoddy school construction

Five surprising salariesupdated: Wed Apr 09 2008 09:07:00

Much has been made of people who live beyond their means. When you see a neighbor bring home a fancy new car, you can't help but wonder how she can afford it on her salary. However, you can't assume you know how much she (or anybody) makes unless you've seen her tax returns.

Alleged third-grader plotupdated: Wed Apr 02 2008 18:17:00

CNN's Sunny Hostin looks at the legal ramifications of an alleged plot to harm a third-grade teacher.

7 qualities you need to be a great parent to a preschooler updated: Tue Jan 22 2008 10:03:00

What's it really take to parent a preschooler? It's pretty simple, once you realize what kids this age can and can't do (and what sets them off and what keeps them happy!). Here are seven qualities that make it much easier to manage all that, and why they're so crucial when you've got an independent-minded, boundary-testing picky eater on your hands.

Time.com: Where Students Can't Hugupdated: Tue Nov 13 2007 17:00:00

Draconian bans on public displays of affection in a growing number of schools have parents and students up in arms. Has the concern about harassment gone too far?

Time.com: Teacher Who Fled With Boy Arrestedupdated: Sat Nov 03 2007 09:00:00

A female schoolteacher and the 13-year-old boy she allegedly ran away with have been arrested in Mexico, a prosecutor said Saturday

Time.com: Birth Control for Kids?updated: Thu Oct 18 2007 14:00:00

The outcry over Portland, Maine's decision to provide the pill to young girls shows that adults still have trouble discussing sex with each other, much less with our kids

Contraceptives for 6th-gradersupdated: Thu Oct 18 2007 12:45:00

A plan to offer birth control to middle school students angers parents, but passes. WGME's Jeff Peterson reports.

Kids use yoga to learn mythology, fight pre-test jittersupdated: Mon Oct 08 2007 11:08:00

Fourth-grade teacher Elisabeth Beckwith wants her students at Fernbank Elementary School in Decatur, Georgia, to pay attention to a lesson on Greek mythology.

Time.com: Sixth Graders Take on Wall Street updated: Fri Sep 07 2007 16:00:00

A trailblazing Chicago school starts economic education early to give inner-city black kids a leg up

Money Magazine: Buy. Hold. Profit. Give Back.updated: Fri Jul 06 2007 04:38:00

John W. Rogers Jr. is a patient man. The head of Ariel Capital Management in Chicago and manager of the flagship Ariel Fund, Rogers typically holds a stock for four or five years, an eternity compared with the 14-month holding period of the average mutual fund.

Money Magazine: Buy. Hold. Profit. Give Back.updated: Sun Jul 01 2007 00:00:00

John W. Rogers Jr. is a patient man. The head of Ariel Capital Management in Chicago and manager of the flagship Ariel Fund (ARGFX), Rogers typically holds a stock for four or five years, an eternity compared with the 14-month holding period of the average mutual fund. In the past decade his fund has earned nearly 14% a year, beating the market by more than five percentage points annually and outperforming three-quarters of all similar funds. Rogers has pulled off this feat while investing much of his own time in two problems that many other leaders have long since given up on: improving inner-city schools and encouraging African Americans to save and invest more. Rogers donates a hefty share of his firm's profits, helps design teaching curriculums, meets with children and educators, and brings students along to board meetings. Here too, patience is paying off: 80% of the eighth-graders who graduate from Ariel Community Academy have been accepted to elite high schools in the Chicago

SI.com: Kevin Armstrong: Grade-changing investigation at Hooverupdated: Wed Jun 27 2007 00:34:00

On April 19, just 11 days prior to the start of spring football practice at Hoover (Ala.) High, athletic director Jerry Browning hosted a meeting in his first-floor office with Andy Craig, the Hoover public schools superintendent.

Dobbs: A legacy in search of a presidentupdated: Tue Jun 19 2007 16:10:00

America's once-proud public school system -- the great equalizer of our democratic society -- is failing an entire generation of students. Millions of high-school students are donning their caps and gowns this month, but a new Education Week report reveals that more than 1.2 million students will fail to graduate high school this year. Half of our black and Hispanic male students are dropping out of public high schools.

A new age of African Madrasasupdated: Fri Apr 27 2007 07:19:00

It's 8 a.m. in the morning and a group of tiny tots are heading towards a simple building on the outskirts of their village near Mombasa.

SI.com: The 10 Spot: Feb. 9, 2007updated: Fri Feb 09 2007 09:46:00

A hot trend in the publishing industry these days is children's books "written" by sports stars. Alex Rodriguez released his effort, Out of the Ballpark, this week, featuring a baseball-crazed boy named Alex who makes an error in a key game because he's trying so darn hard. That joins, among others, Terrell Owens' trenchant Little T Learns to Share. (T.O. apparently hails from the "write what you don't know" school.) Here are some other children's books that we can imagine being penned by sport figures:

CNNMoney: Move over, YouTube!updated: Mon Oct 16 2006 15:10:00

Cody Chang and Jonathan Mohan didn't even know what an entrepreneur was when they signed up for a class on business and entrepreneurship at their local YMCA.

No excuses or short cuts at Atlanta charter school updated: Mon Oct 02 2006 15:11:00

Students at the West Atlanta Young Scholars Academy in Atlanta, Georgia, are expected to go to college.

Pluto's demotion not a cause for classroom panicupdated: Fri Aug 25 2006 10:55:00

Science teachers consider Pluto's flunking out of planet status a plus rather than a minus.

Your Opinion: Flag burningupdated: Thu Aug 24 2006 18:07:00

One story we brought you this week concerned a teacher who, as part of a class exercise, burned the American flag in a civics lesson for seventh graders. We asked for your opinion on the story, and here are a few of your responses, some of which have been edited:

Money Magazine: Everything You Know About Kids and Money is Wrongupdated: Tue Aug 01 2006 00:01:00

AMERICAN STUDENTS MAY BE POOR AT MATH, but when it comes to understanding the money in their lives, they are positively bankrupt. A recent national survey testing high school seniors about basic fi...

At home and school, kids are sedentaryupdated: Tue Jun 20 2006 10:08:00

At home, the phrase "Go watch TV" to kids has replaced "Go outside and play" in many families. At school, the daily hour of recess is dwindling. The combination is contributing to many kids not getting enough exercise, according to some experts.

Red Cross opens storm sheltersupdated: Tue Jun 13 2006 08:03:00

The Red Cross has opened the following emergency shelters in Florida for people affected by Tropical Storm Alberto:

Your e-mails: 'Moment I'll never forget'updated: Sat Jan 28 2006 07:20:00

CNN.com asked readers to share their most vivid memories of the day of the Challenger disaster. That day, millions watching the shuttle take off realized, at the same moment, something had gone terribly wrong. Here is a sampling of those responses, some of which have been edited:

An education in organizationupdated: Fri Aug 12 2005 09:24:00

Ever made a midnight run to buy poster board for a school project due the next morning? Afraid of what forms, homework and other forgotten but important pieces of paper might be unearthed in a thorough backpack search? Have a Top 10 list of excuses for missed assignments?

Money Magazine: 7 Rules For Raising Money Smart Kids CAN YOU INDULGE YOUR CHILDREN WITHOUT SPOILING THEIR CHANCES OF BECOMING RESPONSIBLE ADULTSupdated: Wed Sep 01 2004 00:01:00

Whether you are the parent of a toddler with a burgeoning vocabulary, a kindergartener just learning to read or a 12-year-old headed off to middle school for the first time, there are days when you...

An education in goin' old schoolupdated: Mon Jul 19 2004 09:52:00

There are lots of ways to tell you're officially old. There's a "Sixteen Candles" remake in the works. Madonna's writing children's books. And you go to a David Byrne concert to find yourself surrounded by 50-year-olds. OK, that kind of makes sense since Byrne's hair is now completely gray.

Money Magazine: Each One Teach One With the average college grad $20,000 in debt, our kids need to learn more about finance. updated: Tue Jun 01 2004 00:01:00

For my son Jake, who is now nine and may be none too pleased that I'm telling this story, learning to ride a bike was difficult. His dad and I tried everything we could think of to get him to balan...

Political battle surges over Bush education policyupdated: Thu Jan 08 2004 13:18:00

Gearing up for an election-year fight over the centerpiece of his education agenda, President Bush hailed his "historic" No Child Left Behind Act Thursday and announced he will seek a substantial increase in its funding for 2005.

Money Magazine: Extra Credit THE TEENS WHO MANAGE THE COUNTRY'S RICHEST STUDENT-RUN CREDIT UNION LEARN PLENTY--NOT ALL ABOUT MONEY.updated: Tue Jan 01 2002 00:01:00

It's lunch hour at the Kent Denver School. The cafeteria is serving chicken over rice. Backpacks lie strewn across the common area. Some students sit and do homework, others sprawl on couches and t...

Fortune: Tapping the Last Big Labor Pool The right training programs can turn people in dead-end jobs, as well as the unemployed, into baupdated: Mon Sep 04 2000 00:01:00

It wasn't one of the usual explanations for a plant closing. In early May, Dana Corp. announced it was shutting down an injection-molding facility in Marine City, just northeast of Detroit, where s...

Fortune: To Fix Schools, Discriminate on Spendingupdated: Mon Sep 04 2000 00:01:00

The presidential candidates have seized on education in the hope of finding an issue that will ignite voter excitement. Bush's and Gore's plans differ in nuance, but both men advocate policies that...

Money Magazine: Why Middle-Class Kids Are Losing Out They are at greater risk of receiving unsafe day care, and 11% have lost health insurance supdated: Thu Jan 01 1998 00:01:00

Americans like to say that our children are our most valuable asset. Yet children at all income levels are suffering from neglect--not just the children of poverty, as some would like you to think....

Money Magazine: TROPHY KIDS A NEW ALL-OR-NOTHING PHILOSOPHY IS FORCING YOUR CHILDREN TO COMPETE AGAINST TODAY'Supdated: Sat Mar 01 1997 00:01:00

Lillian Micko had a vision. It was around five o'clock one evening last spring. She was pulling out of a McDonald's drive-through in her hometown of Mount Laurel, N.J. with her boys Danny, 11, and ...

Money Magazine: READING, WRITING--AND UNION WORK RULES A DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN AMERICAN PRINCIPAL:updated: Mon Jul 01 1996 00:01:00

7:46 a.m.: The mother's face tightens into a fist: "It isn't fair! The other kid started the trouble with my boy yesterday." The mother nearly shouts the words into the face of the principal of P.S...

Money Magazine: A POTENTIAL 48% GAIN PUTS THESE EDUCATION STOCKS AT THE HEAD OF THE CLASSupdated: Mon Jan 01 1996 00:01:00

YOU KNOW THE BULL MARKET IS LONG IN THE hoof when a tightwad like me is attracted to three small growth stocks that each rose 100% or better in 1995. Yet I'm convinced that as long as the bulls don...

Money Magazine: Why PRIVATE SCHOOLS ARE RARELY WORTH THE MONEY Forget the myth that private schools are the best. Our survey shows many public supdated: Sat Oct 01 1994 00:01:00

With prep school costs running nearly as high as the $26,000 a year that Ivy League colleges command these days, most families who send their kids to private or parochial schools must sacrifice new...

Fortune: WHAT COMPANIES ARE DOINGupdated: Mon Nov 29 1993 00:01:00

Aetna Life & Casualty Hartford 203-273-1932

Money Magazine: THE WORLD'S BEST 5 IDEAS FRANCE How to prime kids for schoolupdated: Tue Jun 01 1993 00:01:00

While Americans proclaim the social and academic benefits of early-childhood education, the French deliver it: Virtually all children attend preschool, and eight of 10 go to free, government-run in...

Fortune: HOW BUSINESS CAN HELP THE SCHOOLS Results from the fourth annual FORTUNE poll of companies show more commitment to education -- updated: Mon Nov 16 1992 00:01:00

THE EDUCATION message is getting through. When asked how concerned corporations were about the problems in American public schools, 98% of the companies responding to FORTUNE's fourth annual educat...

Fortune: FIXING THE ECONOMY WHERE WILL THE JOBS COME FROM? Big companies are destroying them, small firms aren't hatching them, and wagesupdated: Mon Oct 19 1992 00:01:00

JOBS, JOBS, JOBS! That percussive sound bite uttered by George Bush as the reason for his ill-fated trip to Tokyo has become the watchword of America's anxiety about its economic future. The giant ...

Fortune: STRUGGLING TO SAVE OUR KIDS Many more than ever face the crises of childhood: violence, drugs, bad schools, updated: Mon Aug 10 1992 00:01:00

IF THE WELL-BEING of its children is the proper measure of the health of a civilization, the United States is in grave danger. Of the 65 million Americans under 18, fully 20% live in poverty, 22% l...

Fortune: 'I'M THE LUCKIEST PERSON I EVER MET' Nine successful men and women tell how they managed to overcome often updated: Mon Aug 10 1992 00:01:00

Carl Bernard, a senior at Connecticut College who considers himself so lucky, credits a teacher and a businessman for his change from a ninth-grade dropout to a campus leader. For many of these sur...

Fortune: MOST DANGEROUS AND ENDANGERED As both victims and perpetrators of crime and other pathologies, America's boys updated: Mon Aug 10 1992 00:01:00

WHEN DETROIT announced a plan to open three all-male, all-black public schools last year, the National Organization for Women and the American Civil Liberties Union rose up and defeated it. In resp...

Fortune: WHY KIDS SHOULD LEARN ABOUT WORK They don't know much now. For a better work force -- with a better work ethic -- updated: Mon Aug 10 1992 00:01:00

WHAT DO KIDS know about the world of work, that mysterious adult realm hidden behind the concrete walls of factories and the reflective windows of office towers? Not much, and not nearly enough to ...

Fortune: PRESCHOOL AROUND THE GLOBE The U.S. can't afford to ignore the payoff from early childhood education. Here are grade A lessons fupdated: Mon Oct 21 1991 00:01:00

WHEN IT COMES to early childhood education, the U.S. ranks near the bottom of the class. Nearly every other major industrialized nation -- and even some developing countries -- see the job of educa...

Fortune: SCHOOLS: TACKLING THE TOUGH ISSUES FORTUNE's third annual summit of executives, politicians, and educators focuses on the reformupdated: Mon Dec 17 1990 00:01:00

WILL THE DRIVE to revive America's ailing public schools, launched in the early 1980s, start producing results in the 1990s? It had better. By the latest tally, the high school dropout rate remains...

Money Magazine: Can Your Kid's School Pass This Quality Test? If you want to make sure your children get the best possible updated: Fri Nov 09 1990 00:01:00

At a time when the news is full of alarming reports of the crisis in U.S. education, how do you know whether your kid's school is doing the job? All parents want their children to get the best educ...

Money Magazine: Your College Countdown Attention, would-be freshmen . . . . . . these are dates you dare not miss.updated: Mon Oct 01 1990 00:01:00

For college-bound youngsters and their families, an aptitude for meeting deadlines is the first college entrance requirement. Failure to file the right form at the right time could hurt your chance...

Money Magazine: CAN YOU AFFORD YOUR KIDS? The answer can be upsetting -- unless you make the right financial moves now to meet the truly staggerupdated: Sun Jul 01 1990 00:01:00

Like most parents, Blake Magee's mother and father want only the best for their 15-month-old son. Since both Jennifer and Donald work, they pay a nanny to take care of Blake (left), and hope to pla...

Fortune: COMPUTERS COME OF AGE IN CLASS And VCRs, laser discs, and telecommunications systems too. Electronics makes updated: Mon May 28 1990 00:01:00

STEVE JOBS remembers vividly the day he began to understand supply and demand. As a 12-year-old visitor to a NASA research center, he started fiddling on a computer with a game called King Hammurab...

Fortune: NOW EVERYONE LOVES HEAD START The preschool program is cheap, effective, and due for major expansion. The money updated: Mon May 28 1990 00:01:00

SUDDENLY Head Start is on nearly everybody's agenda. Calling the $1.4 billion federal preschool program ''something near and dear to all of us,'' President Bush proposes to spend an additional $500...

Fortune: MAKING EDUCATION WORK Tutors, mentors, and money help. But business also needs to back radical long-term solutions.updated: Mon May 28 1990 00:01:00

ON THE DAY he was leaving for college, Benny (not his real name) had a last- minute crisis. His mother and her boyfriend, both crack addicts, stole his train fare. At a loss about what to do, Benny...

Fortune: HOW BUSINESS HELPS SCHOOLS All but 2% of the companies responding to a Fortune poll contribute to educatupdated: Mon May 28 1990 00:01:00

BY NOW it is clear: Corporate involvement in public school reform has become serious business. Since the education system has failed to check the erosion of basic skills, companies are proposing in...

Money Magazine: Your Stake in Local Schools TOO OFTEN PUBLIC SCHOOLS WASTE YOUR TAX MONEY. HERE'S HOW TO FIX THAT.updated: Tue May 01 1990 00:01:00

America's 83,000 public schools are spending more but educating our 40 million schoolchildren less. Last year, U.S. taxpayers paid about $4,500 per pupil, up an inflation-adjusted 28% just since 19...

Fortune: A LOOK INSIDE A JAPANESE SCHOOL Don't expect fancy fixtures or lots of expensive electronic gadgets. But you will find plenty ofupdated: Mon Dec 04 1989 00:01:00

JAPAN'S STUDENTS score so high against other youngsters in standardized international tests, and its schools turn out such able workers and managers, that the country's educational system has becom...

Fortune: HOW TO HELP AMERICA'S SCHOOLS A FORTUNE conference of corporate leaders, educators, and politicians suggests a wealth of ways toupdated: Mon Dec 04 1989 00:01:00

BUY A BURGER and catch a disturbing glimpse of America's future. When they ring up your order, those bustling teenagers behind most fast-food restaurant counters are pressing pictures of hamburgers...

Fortune: THE NEW, IMPROVED VOCATIONAL SCHOOL Worried about a shortage of technicians? Can't find people who can communicate and solve proupdated: Mon Jun 19 1989 00:01:00

THE TEACHER CAPTIVATES the class as he paces back and forth, commenting, cracking jokes, asking questions. ''Everybody loves a sincere speaker,'' says the wiry young instructor, immaculately dresse...

Fortune: CEOs FOR 4-YEAR-OLDSupdated: Mon Mar 27 1989 00:01:00

''Investing in our children is not just rhetoric. It's sound business practice, although many of our colleagues have yet to make that discovery.'' So said Arnold Hiatt, CEO of Stride Rite, who alon...

Fortune: HOW TO SMARTEN UP THE SCHOOLS Will the education crisis torpedo U.S. economic preeminence? Business leaders, stuck with undereduupdated: Mon Feb 01 1988 00:01:00

SO IGNORANT and benighted are many young recruits to the U.S. work force that ) one executive after another has recoiled in horror, gasping with astonishment. These are the troops we're supposed to...

Money Magazine: The ABCs of Making Itupdated: Mon Jun 01 1987 00:01:00

James Underwood memorized every question in the driver's license handbook, then persuaded the exam administrator to test him orally. ''People who can't read and write have very good memories,'' he ...

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