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Paul Krugman

As usual, Professor Paul Krugman's piece in the Monday morning New York Times is causing a great deal of chatter among the political types. Krugman points out just how inept the Republican field is. In some cases he takes a scalpel (and in others a machete) to surely the weakest field of presidential aspirants any party has offered in modern American history (see my earlier CNN column comparing this field to 1980). I believe I can explain why this field is so inept. In order to proffer this explanation I am going to utilize Professor Krugman's field of economics.

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Paul Krugman's take on the economyupdated: Mon Aug 15 2011 06:29:00

Nobel Prize winner, Paul Krugman's take on the economy.

Fortune: The U.S. is not falling behindupdated: Wed Nov 24 2010 05:25:00

Commentary on the state of the U.S. economy has once again turned -- sadly -- to America's supposed failings relative to the rest of the world. In a much-cited follow-up to its 2005 report Rising Above the Gathering Storm, for example, an eminent committee of the National Academies reached the unanimous conclusion that when it comes to the principal ingredients of innovation and competitiveness, "our nation's outlook has worsened."

Reading the worried mind of Tim Geithnerupdated: Mon Aug 30 2010 13:58:00

William Safire used to write a column in which he'd try to read the mind of some world leader and imagine what Mikhail Gorbachev or Anwar Sadat really thought, as opposed to the diplomatic niceties they were obliged to utter aloud.

The future of the global economy part 2updated: Fri Jul 09 2010 02:26:00

Paul Krugman and Niall Ferguson continue debate the economic future of the global economy with CNN's Fareed Zakaria.

Depression, double-dip and deficits: Economists speak outupdated: Fri Jul 09 2010 02:26:00

Economist Paul Krugman recently launched a powerful volley in the debate over the best path to growth following the Great Recession -- and dropped the "d" word to do it.

CNNMoney: Ghosts of recessions pastupdated: Tue Jan 26 2010 05:25:00

Congress will soon spar over how to spur jobs.

CNNMoney: Taxing stock trades to pay for jobsupdated: Wed Dec 02 2009 04:54:00

A growing chorus of Democratic lawmakers and liberal economists are pushing hard for a tax on stock trades to pay for job creation.

CNNMoney: Investors brace for a rocky rideupdated: Mon Oct 05 2009 03:54:00

The stock advance has hit some resistance in the last two weeks and it's only going to get tougher as the third quarter reporting period gets underway.

Money Magazine: The case for a nonpartisan portfolioupdated: Wed Sep 09 2009 09:27:00

Most of the time we keep our political opinions and our investing decisions in separate mental compartments. Sure, some folks buy "socially responsible" mutual funds to match the bumper stickers on their Priuses, but they're in the minority. And even they probably don't think that their political sentiments will make them an extra nickel.

Fortune: The next great crisis: America's debtupdated: Thu Jun 11 2009 10:25:00

Normally Paul Krugman, the liberal pundit and Nobel laureate in economics, and Paul Ryan, a conservative Republican congressman from Wisconsin, share little in common except their first names and a scorching passion for views they champion from opposite political poles. So when the two combatants agree on a fundamental threat to the U.S. economy, Americans should heed this alarm as the real thing. What's worrying both Krugman and Ryan is the rapid increase in the federal debt - not so much the stimulus-driven rise to mountainous levels in the next few years, but the huge structural deficits that, under all projections, keep building the burden far into the future to unsustainable, ruinous heights. "The long-term outlook remains worrying," warned Krugman in his New York Times column. Krugman strongly supports President Obama's spending plans but bemoans the shortfall in taxes to pay for them.

CNNMoney: U.S. - with firms - to buy 'bad' assetsupdated: Mon Mar 23 2009 05:25:00

The Obama administration on Monday will formally unveil a program to help banks clean up their books by subsidizing private investors' purchase of troubled assets.

Commentary: Obama under fire from left and rightupdated: Fri Feb 13 2009 08:14:00

We have a deal. This week, House and Senate leaders agreed on a $789 billion stimulus package intended to jumpstart the economy, create millions of jobs, and alleviate some of the financial anxiety suffered by individuals and businesses.

Time.com: The Next Wall Street Tsunami -- of Financial Booksupdated: Tue Oct 28 2008 13:00:00

Given the way things turned out, there was probably a better title for Amit Chatwani's first book, Damn, It Feels Good to Be a Banker

Time.com: The Economy Really Is Fundamentally Strongupdated: Thu Oct 16 2008 20:00:00

John McCain's "gaffe" wasn't really wrong: the U.S. economy will dip, but it should come back

Zakaria: Perfect storm hitting U.S. economyupdated: Fri Jul 11 2008 11:38:00

Between the mortgage crisis, record high oil prices and a lackluster stock market, Americans are not exactly confident about the economy. CNN spoke with world affairs analyst and author Fareed Zakaria about his view of the situation.

Fortune: How bad is the mortgage crisis going to get?updated: Mon Mar 17 2008 05:01:00

If there is any word that captures the mood in the economy right now, it's uncertainty, along with shadings of bafflement and distrust. We have never seen a credit crisis quite like this. What's next?

Fortune: The Smartest Books We Knowupdated: Mon Mar 21 2005 00:01:00

In a perfect world, we'd each have our own consigliere. You know, a Robert Duvall, an oracle of Delphi--someone to follow us around 24/7 and whisper wise words. Paper, not plastic. Google, not Info...

Fortune: Who's Buried By Higher Rates?updated: Mon Jun 14 2004 00:01:00

In Sergio Leone's magnificent Western, The Good, The Bad and the Ugly, Clint Eastwood and Eli Wallach are hunting for stolen gold. The treasure, they discover, is buried under a headstone in a huge...

Fortune: The Recession Lovers' Club Why are some of the most prominent pundits so unwilling to believe that the recession updated: Mon Apr 01 2002 00:01:00

When Alan Greenspan told Senators in early March that "the recent evidence increasingly suggests that an economic expansion is already well under way," it wasn't exactly news to economic forecaster...

Fortune: Dumbed-Down Economics Lately all we're hearing is cheap economic rhetoric from institutions and people who updated: Mon Jan 07 2002 00:01:00

The debate about U.S. economic policy is usually heated--sometimes even rancorous--and more than a little political. But recently it's also been nearly devoid of economic analysis. The arguments fr...

Fortune: What Could Go Right? It's scary. It's a downer. But the slowdown won't last forever. In fact, it may even be ending now.updated: Mon Mar 05 2001 00:01:00

The U.S. economy has ground to a halt. That's certainly not news to anyone at this point. What you and the rest of the world are dying to know is just when America--that powerful, high-tech, and us...

Fortune: Is McCain an Internet Tax Extremist? MIT economist Paul Krugman thinks so, but he's wrong. McCain just wants to updated: Mon Mar 06 2000 00:01:00

One measure of the progress of John McCain's come-from-behind candidacy is that the pundits of the world are starting to take potshots at him. In mid-February, for example, MIT professor Paul Krugm...

Fortune: The Amazing Future of Businessupdated: Mon Mar 06 2000 00:01:00

The 20th century decided one thing: Capitalism rules! The challenge for the 21st will be how we deal with technological change. Here are thoughts from some of America's keenest minds.

Fortune: When Did the Future Get So Boring?updated: Mon Sep 27 1999 00:01:00

It shouldn't have bothered me when Iridium, the satellite-telephone company, filed for Chapter 11 protection. I have no current plans to visit the Gobi Desert, and my GSM phone works everyplace but...

Fortune: Selling Information in the Era of The Web? Aw, Jeez, I Am So Sorry...updated: Mon Aug 16 1999 00:01:00

Go ahead, read this column. It won't cost you anything more than the $4.95 you paid for the magazine. You don't even have to buy it: just borrow someone else's, or read it at the dentist's, or phot...

Fortune: The Ascent of E-Man R.I.P.: THE MAN IN THE GRAY FLANNEL SUITupdated: Mon May 24 1999 00:01:00

I grew up in a planned economy. Bureaucrats didn't run everything: Small-business men were more or less free to buy and sell as they saw fit. But those who controlled the economy's "commanding heig...

Fortune: God Bless Those Timid Workersupdated: Mon Mar 29 1999 00:01:00

Our Valentine's Day getaway didn't quite work out as planned. Like thousands of other Americans, my wife and I were victims of the sickout by American Airlines pilots. I've been stranded by strikes...

Fortune: What In The World Happened To Economics? Economists are all finally speaking the same language, but they still can't answer the updated: Mon Mar 15 1999 00:01:00

Economists rule the world. This is not a new phenomenon. "The ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly un...

Fortune: Should the Fed Care About Stock Bubbles?updated: Mon Mar 01 1999 00:01:00

It was a time of unprecedented prosperity. And it was also a time of soaring stock prices, a time when the market became a national obsession. As more and more ordinary Americans began buying stock...

Fortune: The Energy Noncrisis Explained WASN'T OIL SUPPOSED TO COST $200 A BARREL BY NOW?updated: Mon Feb 01 1999 00:01:00

Recently I picked up a book that predicts a long-term glut in the oil market. Potential oil reserves, the book asserts, are huge relative to world oil demand, and costs of production are declining....

Fortune: I Know What the Hedgies Did Last Summer MORE ECONOMICS: CONSPIRACY THEORYupdated: Mon Dec 21 1998 00:01:00

In spite of Gillian Anderson, I'm not much of a fan of The X-Files, or of conspiracy theories in general. I've met some of the world's leaders, and they seem a lot like the rest of us: Most of the ...

Fortune: Read It and Weep: A Global Crisis Short Listupdated: Mon Nov 23 1998 00:01:00

The great books about the current economic crisis have yet to be written, but FORTUNE asked a group of well-known market analysts and economists to recommend some titles that would help readers get...

Fortune: Foreign Affairs Returns to Relevanceupdated: Mon Oct 26 1998 00:01:00

The financial crisis that started in Asia last year has claimed a lot of victims, but it has also revived an American institution. At the beginning of the 1990s, Foreign Affairs, the highbrow polic...

Fortune: Deflation? Get a Grip You're surrounded by muddled thinking and frenzied talk about whether it's coming and updated: Mon Oct 26 1998 00:01:00

Sherlock Holmes knew the evil that deflation can rouse. "I have seen the will of the deceased wife. To determine its exact meaning I have been obliged to work out the present prices of the investme...

Fortune: Open Mouth. Emit Hot Air. Pray. SAVING THE PLANET FROM CERTAIN DOOM, PART IIupdated: Mon Oct 26 1998 00:01:00

Many years ago, I used to attend Paris meetings at which senior officials from advanced nations gathered to discuss, and in principle to coordinate, their macroeconomic policies. The head of the U....

Fortune: Krugman, Part 2: Hong Kong's Hard Lessonupdated: Mon Sep 28 1998 00:01:00

Don't tell anyone, but I've come up with a nifty financial scheme. First, a few of my billionaire speculator friends quietly take a short position in Microsoft stock. Then we spread the rumor that ...

Fortune: A Letter to Malaysia's Prime Ministerupdated: Mon Sep 28 1998 00:01:00

Dear Dr. Mahathir Mohamad:

Fortune: The Asia Solutionupdated: Mon Sep 07 1998 00:01:00

Listen up. Paul Krugman has something very important and very un-e.c. (economically correct) to say about the careening disaster in Asia. And it's hard to argue that the MIT economist and FORTUNE c...

Fortune: Supply, Demand, and English Foodupdated: Mon Jul 20 1998 00:01:00

We Americans like to boast about our economic turnaround in the '90s, but you could argue that England--where I've spent the past few weeks--is the real comeback story of the advanced world. When I...

Fortune: The Economy Has Two Facesupdated: Mon Jun 22 1998 00:01:00

As a general rule, pundits don't care what happens, as long as it proves them right--or at least gets them on TV. And since pundits generally disagree with each other about what will happen next (i...

Fortune: Lifting The Fog From Antitrustupdated: Mon Jun 08 1998 00:01:00

Once upon a time, antitrust was easy. The original "trusts"--monopolies created by merger, such as the Standard Oil trust, or its emulators in the sugar, whiskey, lead, and linseed oil industries, ...

Fortune: The Ice Age Comethupdated: Mon May 25 1998 00:01:00

The more I look at the amazing rise of the U.S. stock market, the more I'm convinced we are looking at a mammoth psychological problem. I don't mean mammoth as in "huge" (though maybe that too), bu...

Fortune: Who's Afraid Of The Euro?updated: Mon Apr 27 1998 00:01:00

I once attended a conference at which a senior Japanese official made an impassioned speech about the need to establish the yen as an international reserve currency. When my turn came, I explained ...

Fortune: There'll Always Be A Sorosupdated: Mon Mar 30 1998 00:01:00

Say it ain't so, Josephine! When some lovable grandmothers from the heartland published The Beardstown Ladies' Investment Guide, their book became not only a bestseller but a cultural phenomenon. N...

Fortune: Asia: What Went Wrongupdated: Mon Mar 02 1998 00:01:00

There is a part of me that is excited, even happy, about Asia's financial crisis. You see, financial disasters are one of my specialties. The very first serious economics paper I ever wrote, more t...

Fortune: Don't Worry About Deflationupdated: Mon Feb 02 1998 00:01:00

When an acquaintance of mine hired a personal trainer to help enforce his diet and exercise regimen, the results were impressive. Still, I can't help wondering how long his svelte new figure will l...

Fortune: SEVEN HABITS OF HIGHLY DEFECTIVE INVESTORSupdated: Mon Dec 29 1997 00:01:00

I like the theory of efficient financial markets as much as anyone. I don't begrudge Robert Merton and Myron Scholes the Nobel Prize they just received for showing how that theory can help you pric...

Fortune: YOUNGER AND WISERupdated: Mon Nov 24 1997 00:01:00

If you spend much time in airports or reading newspapers, you may have seen our new "younger and wiser" ad campaign. The first word's a matter of fact: FORTUNE's readers tend to be younger than the...

Fortune: REQUIEM FOR THE NEW ECONOMY MILLENNIAL OPTIMISM CONFRONTS REALITYupdated: Mon Nov 10 1997 00:01:00

MIT economist Paul Krugman travels ahead in time to report on the presidential election of 2000:

Fortune: PLAYING POLITICS WITH THE DISMAL SCIENCE WHEN THE DEBATE'S ABOUT HOT-BUTTON POLICY ISSUES, PARTISANSHIP RULES updated: Mon Sep 30 1996 00:01:00

Here's a proposition: Tell me one fact about an economist, and I bet I can predict with almost perfect precision whether he or she thinks Bob Dole's budget plan is a good or bad idea. The fact I wa...

Fortune: THE THEORY THAT MADE MICROSOFT IT'S CALLED "INCREASING RETURNS," AND IT'S ONE OF THE HOTTEST AND MOST IMupdated: Mon Apr 29 1996 00:01:00

Anyone who's taken freshman economics knows how economists cherish the concept of diminishing returns. It's one of those theoretical pillars that keeps the dismal science dismal: The more you make ...

Fortune: THE CASE FOR SMALL GOVERNMENT RECENTLY ECONOMIST PAUL KRUGMAN ARGUED IN THESE PAGES THAT BIG GOVERNMENT ISN'T SO updated: Mon Jun 26 1995 00:01:00

Picture this: The U.S. government finally sells the Postal Service. As with other functions moved from the government to the private sector, the privatized post office does what the government did ...

Fortune: THE DANGER OF NEW TAX CUTS FORGET DYNAMIC SCORING. THIS IS THE WORST POSSIBLE TIME FOR CONGRESS TO BE DEALING A updated: Mon Feb 06 1995 00:01:00

A new group of politicians has arrived in the nation's capital. Elected on a populist platform, they promise the average family an immediate improvement in its economic condition. Many economists a...

Fortune: GREAT NOTIONS FROM JACKSON HOLE updated: Mon Sep 19 1994 00:01:00

Picture it: sparkling lakes, majestic mountains, horse trails, a beautiful lodge, and 120 or so dismal economists. Okay, so it's not everyone's idea of fun, but the annual gathering of leading econ...

Fortune: GLOBAL -- OR JUST GLOBALONEY? Wendell Willkie prophesied a unified world economy in 1943, and it still isn't here. Are our old iupdated: Mon Jun 27 1994 00:01:00

BY THE SHORES of Flathead Lake, Lester Thurow -- economist, MIT professor, and ^ Montana native -- sat down and explained, in a video made a while back for the Missoula Economic Development Corp., ...

Fortune: THE TRUTH ABOUT THE RICH AND THE POOR Are the wealthy gaining at the expense of the poor and the middle class? Conservatives andupdated: Mon Sep 21 1992 00:01:00

THE STATISTICAL gamesmanship over American income trends started early in this election year and has been heating up ever since. Enshrined in Bill Clinton's economic plan is the ''fact'' that the t...

Fortune: PREPARING FOR LEANER TIMES Expectations are lower and anxiety is higher as everybody worries about his job. Maybe it's time to pupdated: Mon Jan 27 1992 00:01:00

WITH SURPRISING suddenness, many Americans have been overtaken by the feeling that tomorrow, next year, and in the decade to come, we may not be better off than today. Ashley Ferry, marketing direc...

Fortune: A SURPRISING NEW VIEW OF THE ECONOMY In which our free-market reviewer finds a lot to like about liberal economist Paul Krugman'updated: Mon Dec 31 1990 00:01:00

Who are you going to believe? Nobel laureate Paul Samuelson calls fellow MIT economist Paul Krugman ''the rising star of this century and the next.'' What's more, says Samuelson, Krugman's The Age ...

Fortune: TAKING AIM AT THE SAVINGS SHORTFALLupdated: Mon Apr 24 1989 00:01:00

''The single greatest problem of the U.S. economy in the late 1980s is its extremely low level of national saving,'' assert the authors of Overconsumption: The Challenge to U.S. Economic Policy. Fa...

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